Resources

29 June 2011

JUGGERNAUT: HOW EMERGING MARKETS ARE RESHAPING GLOBALIZATION. By Uri Dadush and William Shaw for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (June 2011). This book explores the rise of developing countries. Dadush and Shaw project that the global economy will triple over the next forty years and that the advance of a large group of developing economies will drive this improvement. The authors systematically examine the effects of this seismic shift on the main avenues of globalisation - trade, finance, migration, and the global commons - and identify the policy options available to leaders in managing the transformation. In the near future, the rise of emerging economies will likely enhance prosperity but also create tensions that could slow or even halt the process. This publication calls for leadership by the largest countries in managing these tensions, and underscores the need to cultivate a "global conscience." The book is available for purchase online.

CATALYZING DEVELOPMENT - A NEW VISION FOR AID. Edited by Homi Kharas, Koji Makino, and Woojin Jung (2011). This publication argues that, while some may dispute the effectiveness of aid, aid delivered to the right sources and in the right way can promote development in poor and fragile countries. Aid now operates in an arena with new players, such as middle-income countries, private philanthropists, and the business community; new challenges presented by fragile states, capacity development, and climate change; and new approaches, including transparency, scaling up, and South-South co-operation. The next High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness must determine how to organise and deliver aid more effectively in this environment. The book proposes ten actionable ideas to meet these challenges based on scholarly research. The book is available for purchase online.

POLICY SOLUTIONS TO AGRICULTURAL MARKET VOLATILITY: A SYNTHESIS. By Stefan Tangermann for ICTSD (June 2011). This report assesses the causes of recent episodes of volatility in agricultural markets. The author reviews policy responses by different groups of countries, and assesses the likelihood of increased volatility in the future. The report concludes with suggestions for appropriate policy responses for countries at the national and international level. The report is available for download on the ICTSD website.

DESIGN OF MULTI-SECTOR EMISSIONS TRADING SYSTEMS: A COMPARISON OF EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN EXPERIENCES. By Cécile Goubet and Anaïs Delbosc for CDC Climat (May 2011). Europe and the United States have tried to establish coherent climate and energy legislation with varying degrees of success. This Climate Report analyses the characteristics of the main multi-sector emissions trading schemes in the United States, namely the American Power Act, American Clean Energy and Security Act, and California Cap and Trade Program; it also examines the EU's Emissions Trading Scheme or EU ETS. The conclusion of the report is that the implementation of an emissions trading scheme in the United States at a federal or regional level should not have an impact in the short term on the operation of the EU ETS. The report is available online.

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22 June 2011
WTO members are struggling to reach consensus on what the components of their December "Plan B" deliverables package might entail. Today's meeting of the WTO's Trade Negotiations Committee (TNC) saw...
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29 June 2011
30 June, Saint James, Trinidad and Tobago. EXPERT GROUP MEETING ON THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN. This forum will discuss the results of the "Understanding...
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