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В борьбе за место в глобальной цепочке создания стоимости

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8,
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3
Date period: 
Wednesday, 10 June 2015 - 12:00am
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Dr Stephenson gave a keynote presentation in the Opening Session of the Public-Private Dialogue, at the sidelines of the Second APEC Senior Officials'Meeting , on : “Services and Inclusive Growth” to discuss opportunities and challenges of the three sectors of focus, including industries’experiences in the Global Value Chain (GVC),  the policy and regulatory environment in which they operate and the trade barriers that confront them.

Greater liberalization of services sectors in Asia-Pacific markets is needed to widen the door for small business participation in cross-border trade and usher in improved job creation, growth and quality of life for people across the region, senior officials and private sector representatives agree.

Policy options for easing barriers to trade and investment in services, and case studies from the agricultural, environmental infrastructure and manufacturing industries, were put forward during a just concluded APEC public-private dialogue in Boracay (The Philipppines). It set the tone for the APEC Ministers Responsible for Trade Meeting this weekend and a preceding gathering of APEC Senior Officials to advance new measures that boost progressive trade, growth and development.

“Services make up approximately 67 per cent of GDP in the APEC region,” said Ambassador Laura Q. Del Rosario, Philippine Undersecretary of Foreign Affairs and 2015 Chair of the APEC Senior Officials’ Meeting. “Efforts to improve trade and investment in services will play a vital role in inclusive growth by creating new jobs and allowing people from all parts of the economy to participate in the economic and social mainstream.”

“Through logistics, transportation and supply chain management, services enable the smooth movement of agriculture and goods from producers to consumers,” Ambassador Del Rosario explained. “Environment-related services are helping to transform environmental infrastructure into modern and efficient sectors,” she added.

Development of a new APEC Services Cooperation Framework, a new APEC Virtual Knowledge Center to help members improve the design of regulation to facilitate trade and investment in services sectors and structural reform implementation will be points of emphasis for Ministers and officials over the next week. Sectoral measures, including tax reforms that lift tourism businesses and entrepreneurs as well as avenues for opening environmental services, building on APEC’s commitment to lower tariffs on environmental goods, are also in focus.

“Services sectors are now at the center of a major business transformation in APEC, contributing more intensively to the value chains in manufacturing and agriculture and to the way business trades and invests,” noted Doris Magsaysay Ho, President and CEO of the Magsaysay Group of Companies and 2015 Chair of the APEC Business Advisory Council. “More open trade and investment in services help smaller companies, professionals and service providers who have focused more on domestic markets.”

Three-quarters of small and medium enterprises are involved in services and heavily engaged in global production and supply chains given that they are less capital intensive and require less physical infrastructure than manufacturing activities. Because production scale is smaller, such firms can furthermore develop expertise in one specific task within a value chain.

Yet small and medium enterprises, which account for more than 97 per cent of all businesses and over half of employment in APEC member economies, still account for a far smaller proportion of their exports.

“There is huge potential for SMEs to participate in trade and value chains,” concluded Dr Sherry Stephenson, Senior Fellow of the International Center for Trade and Sustainable Development and a member of the Pacific Economic Cooperation Council which co-hosted the dialogue. “Services offer the best path to inclusive growth in diverse ways including through contributing to poverty reduction, increasing connectivity and employment, and encouraging SMEs to actively engage in trade."

 

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Place: 
Boracay, Aklan, Philippines
Event type: 
We participate
Theme: 
SERVICES
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Region: 
Asia
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Language: 
English
Date period: 
Sunday, 17 May 2015 - 9:00am

Des ressources aux chaînes de valeur: enjeux de la transformation structurelle africaine

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16,
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2
Date period: 
Wednesday, 29 April 2015 - 10:00am
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No longer a new concept, global and regional value chains (GVCs and RVCs) are a recognised part of the market landscape. Nonetheless, value chains are not well understood in the policy world: they are highly diverse and their functioning is not well understood systemically. A key question is whether and how participation in GVCs and RVCs can help achieve sustainable development objectives.

This seminar will look at recent empirical work in the area to advance understanding on GVCs and RVCs and the potential implications for pursuing such objectives through trade-related policies.

This event will be webcast live from this page.

The registration for this event is now closed.

Background information

Emerging evidence in recent years indicates that participation in global value chains (GVCs) could help countries to generate economic growth while building innovation, skills enhancement, and market development that can underpin national development processes.

For smaller firms from developing economies, value chains offer the possibility of entering the global market on a less costly basis and one more suited to their conditions and advantages. Value chains sidestep the need for these firms to acquire a competitive advantage for an entire product; instead, they can specialise on a single ”task” within the value chain.

The value chain narrative provides a different way of thinking about trade and development, but the extent to which it is useful will depend on two things: policymakers will need to understand how values chains work and their economic and social implications; and to the extent they are perceived as being supportive of national priorities they must integrate this understanding into national strategies and policies domestically and into international frameworks.

This seminar will be geared towards exploring the potential trade and value chain linkages in achieving both systemic and national objectives. Additionally, it will be an opportunity to highlight potential competitiveness opportunities and demands and the complementary role of Aid for Trade in responding to these needs.

We look forward to welcoming you at our event. 

Access the OECD work on GVCs here: http://www.oecd.org/industry/ind/global-value-chains.htm

 

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Geneva, Switzerland
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Updates: 
Services trade through the GVC lens: lessons for AfricaChallenges ahead for services trade: What should developing countries be aware of?How can African countries boost their participation in the services aspects of GVCs?How should Sub-Saharan African countries think about global value chains?Towards an alternative narrative for the multilateral trading systemProgression dans les chaînes de valeur mondiales: le cas des pays d’Afrique subsaharienneADB report identifies participation in global value chains as key for Africa’s transformationGlobal Value Chains in Focus as WTO Reviews Aid for Trade's ProgressGlobal value chains and Aid for Trade: An African perspective
Region: 
Global
Main Tag: 
Event
Language: 
English
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This seminar is organised jointly with the OECD

Date period: 
Thursday, 23 April 2015 - 12:16pm