Kimberly Ann Elliott

Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development

Kimberly Ann Elliott is a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development and the author or co-author of numerous books and articles on trade policy and globalization, with a focus on the political economy of trade and the uses of economic leverage in international negotiations. She chaired the CGD working group that produced the report, Open Markets for the Poorest Countries: Trade Preferences that Work. Her most recent book, Delivering on Doha: Farm Trade and the Poor, was copublished in July 2006 by CGD and the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

Elliott was with the Peterson Institute for many years before joining the Center full-time and remains a visiting fellow. Her publications there include Can International Labor Standards Improve under Globalization? (with Richard B. Freeman, 2003), Corruption and the Global Economy (1997), Reciprocity and Retaliation in US Trade Policy (with Thomas O. Bayard, 1994), Measuring the Costs of Protection in the United States (with Gary Hufbauer, 1994), and Economic Sanctions Reconsidered (with Gary Hufbauer and Jeffrey Schott, 3rd. ed., 2007).

From 2002 to 2003, she served on the National Academies Committee on Monitoring International Labor Standards; from 2009-2012 she was a member of the USDA Consultative Group on the Elimination of Child Labor in U.S. Agricultural Imports; and, in 2011, she was appointed chair of the Department of Labor’s National Advisory Committee on Labor Provisions of U.S. Free Trade Agreements.

Bridges news

22 February 2018
La régulation du protectionnisme agricole constitue depuis longtemps un défi pour les négociateurs commerciaux. Le Cycle de Doha s’est heurté à cet écueil et l’impasse sur les stocks publics perdure. L’OMC devrait-elle simplement laisser tomber l’agriculture ? Au début des années 2000, les...
15 February 2018
Disciplining agricultural protectionism has long been a challenge for trade negotiators. The Doha Round stumbled over it and the impasse over public stockholding continues. Should the WTO just give up on agriculture? In the early 2000s, subsidies and trade barriers in rich countries were helping...
10 March 2016
The US should implement a DFQF program for all LDCs that covers as close to 100 percent of products as possible, and more than the minimum 97 percent it promised at the Sixth Ministerial Conference in Hong Kong. All preference programmes for LDCs should make rules of origin simple to use and...
4 June 2012
The U.S. African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) of 2000 marked a major change in American trade policy towards poor countries. The program went well beyond the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) for all developing countries, extending duty-free treatment to 97 percent of eligible products...
15 June 2010
Reconnaissant le rôle du commerce dans la réduction de la pauvreté, l'accès aux marchés en franchise de droits et sans contingent pour les PMA est l'un des Objectifs du Millénaire pour le développement (OMD), dont le progrès sera évalué lors du sommet des Nations Unies au mois de septembre. En se...
1 June 2010
Recognising the role of trade in poverty reduction, "duty-free, quota-free market" access for LDCs is one of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the progress of which will be assessed at a UN summit this September. Based on the analysis of a recently convened expert group, Kimberly Ann Elliott...