Marie Wilke

Marie WILKE was International Trade Law Programme Officer at ICTSD. In that capacity she was responsible for the Centre’s projects on legal capacity and WTO dispute settlement. Since joining ICTSD in 2009, she has been invited to lecture numerous training courses on WTO law and dispute settlement, organised by, among others, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the International Development Law Organisation (IDLO). She has also been a guest lecturer on issues relating to trade law and natural resources management, including at the Universities of Oldenburg, Edinburgh and Cambridge. Prior to joining ICTSD she worked for UNCTAD’s Trade Negotiations and Commercial Diplomacy branch and for the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) Trade Policy Branch.
Ms. Wilke is also a Legal Research Fellow with the Centre for International Sustainable Development Law (CISDL) where her work focuses primarily on natural resources management and international economic law. In 2012 she was selected as a Future Environmental Leader to attend the Global Environments Summer Academy (GESA). She holds a LL.M. in Public International Law (summa cum laude) from Helsinki University, and a LL.B. in Comparative and European Law from Hanse Law School. Ms. Wilke has published numerous book chapters and peer-reviewed journal articles on economic global governance and natural resources management, and is a regular contributor to ICTSD’s periodical publications Bridges Weekly and BioRes Review. She is citizen of Germany.

Bridges news

14 October 2015
How best to ensure socially-responsible trade in the face of long and complex global value chains? Supply-chain due diligence is increasingly becoming a business reality and a regulatory requirement. The most recent example for mandatory regulation is a proposal by the European Parliament to...
2 September 2014
Some experts argue the seal products import ban case not only revealed the limits of the WTO’s GATT general exceptions clause but was also a missed opportunity for introducing greater legal coherence. The connection between international economic law and the rights of indigenous peoples,...
18 June 2012
The WTO's highest court ruled on 16 May that the US "dolphin-safe" label violates WTO law by discriminating against Mexican tuna. The judgement, marking a tentative end to the decade-old conflict between Washington and Mexico City, was immediately lambasted by environmentalists and US consumer...
9 November 2011
On 15 September , a WTO panel handed down a mixed ruling in a dispute brought by Mexico over the US “dolphin-safe” label for tuna products. The three panel members — confronted with the difficult question of whether requirements for a voluntary label can be a de facto mandatory regulation and as...
2 May 2011
On 21 April a joint panel was established at the WTO to hear Canada's and Norway's claims against a European Commission (EC) ban on seal products that was adopted by the trade block in 2009. With this step, one of the most controversial and emotional cases at the WTO enters the next stage. Although...
6 April 2011
A climate protection policy already used widely all around the globe recently entered the stage of WTO dispute settlement. With Japan's challenge of a Canadian feed-in-tariff (FIT), the WTO might soon have to rule for the first time on a support policy for renewable power generation. With around 50...
6 April 2011
While governments and trade experts continue to dispute whether current WTO law is sufficiently equipped to address government support of a "green economy," a WTO panel might soon have to apply these very rules to determine the legality of Chinese subsidies to its wind power manufacturers. In...
26 October 2010
Enquanto as discussões sobre a definição de recursos genéticos, derivativos e sua utilização prosseguem de forma acalorada, a existência de uma longa lista de possíveis exceções agrega maior ambiguidade ao escopo substantivo do Protocolo sobre Acesso a Recursos Genéticos e Repartição de Benefícios...
7 September 2009
The ‘buy national' clauses that numerous governments have included in their economic stimulus packages are causing growing concern. For many developing countries, bilateral investment treaties may be the best option for legal recourse against such provisions. Despite their likely trade-distorting...