This is one of the outreach meetings of the 2018 State of the EU ETS Report, organised in 4 European capitals. During this meeting, the authors will present the Report and their findings through a presentation, after which the Report will be discussed in a roundtable setting with stakeholders. 

The “2018 State of the EU ETS” Report, the third of its kind, aims to provide such an independent contribution to the policy debate, which is needed to ensure that the EU ETS is “fit for purpose”. This Report discusses the current state of play in the EU ETS, analyses whether the system is performing and delivering, and discusses how the recently concluded Phase 4 review could affect its functioning from 2020 onwards.
 
This meeting is hosted by Confindustria, and will take place at their premises. 
 
To participate in this event, please register by using this link
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The 2018 State of the EU ETS Report is a joint initiative by ERCST/ICTSD, Nomisma Energia, I4CE, Wegener Center at the University of Graz and EcoAct

Date period: 
Monday, 18 June 2018 - 1:00pm

Room W. Centre William Rapard, ©WTO

 

The ELSA Moot Court Competition on WTO Law (EMC2) is a student-organized competition designed to enhance knowledge of international trade law and WTO dispute settlement procedures. ELSA is especially dedicated to enhance capacity for meaningful engagement in multilateral trade in the long term.

 

ELSA Moot Court Competition on WTO Law (EMC2) 

The European Law Students’ Association (ELSA) is an international, independent, non-political, non-profit organization run by and for students and young lawyers since 1981. The EMC2 is one of the flagship activities of ELSA since 2002.

The main aim of the Competition is to assist countries in developing their technical legal capacity by preparing the next generation of trade lawyers and negotiators. With technical support from the WTO, the Competition has grown to become the only global moot court competition on WTO Law.

Participants from around the world send in written submissions, for the complainant and respondent, in a fictitious case. After sending their submissions, all the teams are given the opportunity to present oral arguments in front of panels which consist of WTO and trade law experts. Winning teams from five Regional Rounds (two European Rounds; an Asia-Pacific Round; an All-American Round; and for the last three years, an African Round) compete against each other in the Final Oral Round held in Geneva, Switzerland at the WTO headquarters. 

The African Regional Round of EMC2

The African Regional Round was held for the first time in 2013, and has since grown in terms of participation and support of universities in the region. The organizers welcome donations and other forms of support in order to encourage and sustain the active participation of universities in the region.

 

Who has participated?

In the first ever Africa Regional Round held in 2013, 7 teams from 6 different countries participated. In 2015, 8 teams from 5 countries participated: Kenya, Lesotho, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. Two of these teams also included nationals from Zimbabwe and the Democratic Republic of Congo. In 2016, 10 teams competed from various African countries, including: Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Ethiopia and South Africa. In 2017, teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Liberia, Lesotho, and Uganda participated. This year, teams from 10 different countries (Ethiopia, Malawi, Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Lesotho, Tunisia, Zimbabwe, Nigeria and Uganda) will participate, with Nigeria, Tunisia and Zimbabwe joining the competition for the first time.

 

How to get involved?

Your valued contribution will help ELSA International in supporting the participation of students in the region at the African Regional Round and the final Oral Round in Geneva in June. Donation instructions can be found at > emc2.elsa.org/partners/ (Please indicate Support for the African Teams as donation purpose)

 

ICTSD as a sponsor

The goal of ICTSD is to advance sustainable development through trade-related policy making. ICTSD strives to ultimately strengthen developing countries’ legal capacity.

Since 2014, ICTSD has been providing institutional support to the African Round of EMC2 as a sponsor. ICTSD considers the Competition as one of the keys to having a pool of young talents in the field and in turn further the legal capacity in the region. 

 

Participant's testimony

“Taking part in this competition opened my eyes to a whole new world with possibilities I had never even contemplated. The moot gave me insight into the world of WTO dispute resolution and actually got me interested in pursuing this as a career option. The moot fueled my desire to one day be among the few international trade law specialist lawyers in Africa.” 

Diana Rufaro Machingaidze, participant 2014/2015

 

The 2017-2018 Round

25 April – 29 April 2018

Strathmore University, Nairobi

EMC2, African Round > emc2.elsa.org 

 

The Hosting University

Strathmore University participated in last year’s African Regional Rounds of the EMC2 with success. This participation has resulted in increased academic interest among students and faculty at the university, and incentivized students to enhance their capacities in this field through further study or relevant career path.  The Strathmore Law School has decided to host the African Regional Round in order to contribute to this important capacity building initiative, which has already created enormous opportunities for learning and personal growth among African students. Strathmore Law School (SLS) is one of the constituent schools of Strathmore University (SU), a leading non-profit private university in Kenya, which aims at serving the Kenyan society to the best of its ability. SU holds a peerless reputation for quality in academic and professional education as well as personal formation. 

 

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Strathmore University
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Wednesday, 25 April 2018 - 10:00am to Sunday, 29 April 2018 - 10:00am

ICTSD will participate in this workshop organised by the Permanent mission of Canada in Geneva and the WTO. 

The official event webpage and the programme can be consulted at this link

 

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WTO - Room W, Centre William Rappard
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Date period: 
Friday, 16 March 2018 - 11:30am to 1:00pm

This year’s World Economic Forum on Latin America takes place from 13-15 March in São Paulo, Brazil, bringing together global and regional leaders from government, business and civil society.

ICTSD participates (represented by Ricardo Meléndez-Ortiz, ICTSD Chief Executive)

Maximizing the Benefits of Trade Facilitation in Latin America

Thursday 15 March, 07:45-09:00

Private

While almost all Latin American countries have ratified the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) and are embarking on promising trade facilitation reforms, trading in the region remains complex and costly. Despite the similar nature of trade bottlenecks and some successful reforms in next-door countries, very little trade facilitation experience is being exchanged across Latin America.

On the agenda:

  • Exchange best practices and lessons learned from trade facilitation efforts in the region by governments, private sector and other regional stakeholders;
  • Discuss concrete examples from the Global Alliance for Trade Facilitation’s projects in Latin America. The Alliance is a public-private platform that supports trade facilitation reforms by leveraging private sector expertise.

Redefining Resource-Led Growth

Thursday 15 March,
09:45-10:30

Private

Fourth Industrial Revolution technologies strongly rely on a range of raw materials that are plentiful in Latin America’s soil. What are the conditions for society to benefit from these technologies while creating local economic and social prosperity?

On the agenda:

  • Incorporating smart use of resources in technology innovation
  • Redefining sustainable impact of global value chains
  • Fostering cross-industry and public-private partnerships

The Tide Is Turning: International Trade in 2018

Thursday 15 March,
11:00-12:00

Public

With established agreements being reworked, how should stakeholders navigate an uncertain trade landscape?

This session was developed in partnership with El Pais.

This session is associated with the System Initiative on Shaping the Future of International Trade and Investment and the Center for the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Watch the webcast

Shaping Industrial Development Strategies in Latin America

Thursday 15 March,
14:00-15:30

Private

The world of production – which is more than manufacturing and stretches from R&D and design, to consumers and end-of-use cycles – is undergoing unprecedented transformations driven by technologies such as 3D printing, artificial intelligence, the internet of things and next-generation robotics.

These transformations are unleashing a new wave of competition between producers and countries, and can provide significant opportunity and growth. The Forum’s System Initiative on Shaping the Future of Production is working closely with countries in Latin America to inform the design of a next generation of industrial development strategies to disseminate technology, boost productivity, create jobs and position the region as a key player in future production systems.

Accelerating Regional e-Commerce

Thursday 15 March,
16:00-17:30

Private

E-commerce holds the potential to drive growth and ensure the benefits of trade are more widely spread to small businesses. Yet, business-to-consumer e-commerce in Latin America is low compared with other regions. What barriers need to be addressed to drive change?

 

Select relevant trade and investment sessions

Regional Integration: Full Steam Ahead? 

Wednesday 14 March, 10:00-11:00
Grand Hyatt São Paulo, Briefing Centre

Public

With protectionist rhetoric on the rise, countries are rethinking their trade strategies. Is this the boost the region needs to overcome long-standing resistance to integration? Dimensions to be addressed: – Building ties between Mercosur and the Pacific Alliance – Pursuing financial integration – Strengthening regional value chains.

Speakers: Alberto Bello, Alicia Bárcena Ibarra, Nicola Calicchio, Ildefonso Guajardo Villarreal, Alejandro Ramírez, Marcos Troyjo

Watch the webcast

E-Commerce: Expanding Trade Horizons

Wednesday 14 March, 18:45-19:15, Grand Hyatt São Paulo, Briefing Centre

Public

The expansion of e-commerce offers new markets for SMEs and entrepreneurs, and is poised to drive inclusive growth. What top challenges are ripe for international collaboration? Join this issue briefing for the latest insights on global e-commerce from e-payments to trade in digital services.

Speakers: Jean-Claude Ramirez, Roberto Azevêdo, Jeff Kratz, Demetrios Marantis

Watch the webcast

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São Paulo, Brazil
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Tuesday, 13 March 2018 - 12:56pm to Thursday, 15 March 2018 - 12:56pm

This year’s World Economic Forum Annual Meeting took place from 23-26 January in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland, marking two years since the initial launch of the E15 Synthesis Report in 2016.

The following sessions relevant to E15 work took place:

 

ICTSD participated (represented by Ricardo Meléndez-Ortiz, ICTSD Chief Executive)

Facilitation 2.0 – Trade, Investment and Services

Wednesday 24 January,
09:30-11:00

Private

Boosting global commerce in the 21st century means making it easier to trade goods and services and invest abroad. Simplification, automation, harmonization and transparency are just some of the ways to reduce frictions and help trade and investment flow.

The Global Alliance for Trade Facilitation is delivering commercially impactful border reforms through collaboration by business, donors and governments.

On the agenda:

  • What have we learnt and how can we further cooperate to accelerate practical reforms to ease investment and trade in goods and services?

Accelerating Digital Trade Opportunities and Solutions

Thursday 25 January,
09:30-11:00

Private

The workshop scoped options to boost global e-commerce and advance an Enabling E-Commerce initiative. Participants also explored ways to best develop interoperable frameworks for data flows and determine avenues for rapid impact.

On the agenda:

  • What are the challenges in the digital trade landscape and what are potential solutions?
  • What are the best ways to develop interoperable frameworks for data flows and determine avenues for rapid impact?

 

Select relevant trade and investment sessions

Saving Economic Globalization from Itself

Tuesday 23 January, 16:00-17:00
Congress Centre, Aspen 2

Public

While the benefits of international trade and investment were promoted globally, the social and economic costs to some communities were ignored. Can a renewed focus on its damaging local effects save economic globalization from itself?

This session was developed in partnership with Quartz.

Speakers: Mauricio Cardenas, Devin Wenig, Chanda Kochhar, Minouche Shafik, Sharan Burrow, Rich Lesser, Kevin Delaney

Watch the webcast

Enabling eCommerce: Small Enterprises, Global Players

Wednesday 24 January, 11:30-12:15, Congress Centre, Congress Hall

Public

Breaking down barriers to international e-commerce promises to expand export opportunities for small businesses, giving them a global presence that was once reserved for large multinational firms. How can we shape digital policies and practices to benefit rising entrepreneurs?

Speakers: Stephen J. Adler, David Abney, Chrystia Freeland, Ildefonso Guajardo Villarreal, Takeshi Niinami, Soren Skou

Watch the webcast

Future Shocks: Systemic Trade Tremors

Wednesday 24 January,
16:30-17:30
Congress Centre, Aspen 2

Public

Against a backdrop of surging anti-globalization sentiment, multilateral rules are at risk of being openly breached, potentially triggering adverse impacts and retaliatory moves along global value chains. What if bilateral trade wars cascade and multilateral dispute resolution institutions are too weak to respond?

Explore the possible, plausible and probable impacts of dismantling the international trade architecture.

Speakers: Alan Murray, Roberto Azevêdo, David W. MacLennan, Bill Winters

Watch the webcast

New Avenues for Global Trade

Thursday 25 January,
13:00-14:00 Congress Centre, Aspen 2

Public

With NAFTA negotiations at a sticking point, Mexico and Canada are strengthening linkages outside North America, and TPP11 and RCEP are inching towards completion. Is greater protectionism in multiple global capitals clearing the ground for a new trade landscape?

Speakers: Stephen J. Adler, David Abney, Chrystia Freeland, Ildefonso Guajardo Villarreal, Takeshi Niinami, Soren Skou

Watch the webcast

 

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Tuesday, 23 January 2018 - 9:38am to Friday, 26 January 2018 - 9:38am

The past few years have witnessed an increasingly intense debate on the world-wide growth of national data localization restrictions and barriers to Cross-Border Data Flows (CBDF). Data localization proposals and policies typically involved requirements such as: data must be processed by entities physically within a national territory; data processing must include a specific level of “local content,” or the use of locally provided services or equipment; data must be locally stored or “resident” in a national jurisdiction; data processing and/or storage must conform to national rather than internationally accepted technical and operational standards; or data transfers must be routed largely or solely within a national or regional space when possible. Barriers to CBDF may involve: prohibitions on the transfer of personally identifiable information to jurisdictions deemed to have inadequate laws regarding privacy and data protection; censorship and other limitations on information that governments deem to be ‘sensitive;’ or digital trade protectionism. Governments’ motivations for establishing such policies vary and may include goals such as promoting local industry, technology development, employment, and tax revenue; protecting their citizens’ privacy (or in some cases, claiming to); ensuring access to data for the purposes of law enforcement, and more broadly defending their legal jurisdiction over data; or advancing national security or an expansive vision of “cyber-sovereignty.”

The stakes here are high. For example, the McKinsey Global Institute has estimated that data flows enabled economic activity that boosted global GDP by US $2.8 trillion in 2014, and that data flows now have a larger impact on growth than traditional flows of traded goods. The growth of localization measures and barriers to data transfers could reduce these values and significantly impair not only business operations but also economic development and many vital social processes that are predicated upon the movement of data across a relatively open and unfragmented Internet. Accordingly, specific language limiting such policies has been included in a number of “mega-regional” trade agreements, such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA). While the TPP has been rejected by the new US government and the forecast for other agreements is cloudy at best, it is possible that at least some of the policies in question are inconsistent with certain governments’ existing commitments under the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). Even so, the extent to which these issues should be addressed via trade instruments remains a highly controversial issue, with many in the global Internet community and civil society remaining very critical of non-transparent intergovernmental approaches to an increasingly important piece of global Internet governance, and many privacy advocates vehemently opposing the potential application of trade rules to personal data.

Accordingly, the purposes of this proposed workshop are four-fold. First, it would bring together senior participants in the international trade and Internet governance communities that to date have not had sufficient opportunities to dialogue on their respective approaches to these and related issues. Second, it would take stock of the growth of data localization measures and barriers to data flows and assess the scope and impacts of such policies. Third, it would consider what can be achieved via international trade instruments given the current geopolitical context. Fourth, and most importantly, it would explore the possibility of constructing a parallel track of multistakeholder dialogue and decisionmaking that is balanced and enjoys the support of diverse actors around the world. In particular, we would consider whether a global community of expertise and practice can be constructed to share information and devise effective normative agreements on the issues. Normative agreements involving sufficient monitoring and reporting could help to ensure that data policies are not applied in a manner that constitutes arbitrary discrimination or disguised digital protectionism, and do not impose restrictions that are greater than what is required to achieve legitimate public policy objectives.

ICTSD will be represented by its Chief Executive, Ricardo Meléndez-Ortiz, who will participate as a speaker in the session.

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Room XXVI - E, Palais des Nations, Geneva
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Tuesday, 19 December 2017 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm

Carbon pricing is one of the most promising and effective tools to accelerate climate action. While more than 40 countries and regions have already implemented policies to this end, we are still a long way from a global carbon price.

There are many challenges related to the implementation of carbon pricing policies. For one, there are carbon leakage concerns and the difficulty of establishing a carbon price that sufficiently reflects the negative externalities of emissions. Moreover, possible socio-economic effects related to a price increase of goods and services would need to be properly addressed as well as the question of how to use the revenues generated from pricing carbon.

It is against this backdrop that I4CE, AFD and Enerdata organised this COP 23 event to discuss the issue of carbon pricing policies and the opportunities offered by the use of carbon revenues. ICTSD was represented by Andrei Marcu, Senior Fellow, ICTSD and Director, ERCST who participated as a speaker in the roundtable. 

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Bonn, Germany
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Carbon pricing in the G20: A window for advancing sustainable development
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Date period: 
Wednesday, 8 November 2017 - 10:00am

The Paris Agreement on climate change has paved the way for climate action around the globe. To fully accelerate the transition to a low-carbon economy it is necessary that states agree on the remaining details of the Accord, including on how to operationalise Article 6 on voluntary cooperation.

Countries have pledged in their nationally determined contributions to level-up climate action. While this constitutes an important step for the climate, a consensus on how to link regional, national, and sub-national policies has not been reached yet. In particular, a central challenge is how to facilitate the use of internationally transferred mitigation outcomes for the purpose of meeting a country’s own mitigation objectives, in the context of the great heterogeneity that characterises individual NDCs.

It is against this backdrop that Harvard University and Fondazione Centro Studi Enel organised this COP 23 side event on how to link carbon pricing instruments. ICTSD was represented by Andrei Marcu, Senior Fellow, ICTSD and Director, ERCST who participated as a speaker in the roundtable. 

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Bonn, Germany
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Three-Dimensional Climate Clubs: Implications for Climate Cooperation and the G20Carbon Market Clubs under the Paris Climate Regime: Climate and Trade Policy Considerations
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Tuesday, 14 November 2017 - 11:30am

The design and implementation of ambitious climate change mitigation measures is key for paving the way for a low-carbon future. At the same time, the implementation of these measures may also impact social and economic objectives, including in other countries. To minimize any policy conflicts in this regard, it is necessary that possible negative impacts of response measures are being properly addressed.

Discussions on response measures remain an important piece of the UNFCCC negotiating process. At COP 23, countries shared views and experiences on the impact response measures may have across countries and how economic diversification and a just transition of the workforce could help mitigate these effects. While a just transition of the workforce is needed to make the shift to a low-GHG economy equitable, economic diversification could provide the necessary framework to achieve this transition – and trade has an important role to play in this context. While trade can function as an enabler for a just transition, cutting across the various domains relevant to climate policy and sustainable development, the challenge is to ensure that it helps all countries share the benefits of transforming their economies.

It is against this backdrop that UNCTAD and UNFCCC organised this COP 23 side event to look at economic diversification, a just transition of the workforce and global value chains in the context of sustainable development. ICTSD was represented by Andrei Marcu, Senior Fellow, ICTSD and Director, ERCST who participated as a speaker in the roundtable.

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The Role of Response Measures in Ensuring the Sustainable Transition to a Low-GHG Economy
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Thursday, 16 November 2017 - 6:30pm

Subsidies to fossil fuels harm the environment, add to health hazards caused by air pollution, and pose an obstacle to the shared goal of combatting climate change. The need to phase them out is thus urgent. 

Countries have pledged to put an end to the subsidisation of fossil fuels in a number of fora, including the G20, the G7, and APEC. Moreover, the adoption of the Paris Agreement on climate change and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development has added further calls for their phase-out. Yet, despite these commitments, countries continue to subsidise the exploration, processing, and use of fossil fuels.

It is against this backdrop that ODI and FARN are organising a workshop on subsidies and public finance for fossil fuels, parallel to the 11th Ministerial Conference of the WTO, focusing on action at the international level and in G20 countries. ICTSD will be represented by Ingrid Jegou, Senior Associate, who will be moderating a break-out session on the role of the trade system in addressing fossil fuel subsidies. 

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Buenos Aires, Argentina
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How the WTO Can Help Tackle Climate Change through Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reform: Lessons from the Fisheries NegotiationsFossil Fuel Subsidies Reduction and the World Trade OrganizationPhasing Out Fossil Fuel Subsidies in the G20: Progress, Challenges, and Ways ForwardThe WTO subsidies agreement can be changed to discipline fossil fuel subsidiesThree-Dimensional Climate Clubs: Implications for Climate Cooperation and the G20Making the Global Economy Viable for the Future: A Trade and Climate Agenda for the G20
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Date period: 
Wednesday, 13 December 2017 - 8:30am to Thursday, 14 December 2017 - 2:00pm