Import Ref: 
42
Import Imported: 
1

Consumption is a key driver of rising emissions, including through imports of carbon embedded in internationally traded goods and services.

The climate community therefore needs to account for consumption-related emissions and explore policies for addressing them. Demand-side policies can help to more directly address consumption as a driver of emissions through a wider range of mitigation options in the value chain and at the point of final consumption.

This side-event will explore the role of consumption-based accounting and examine potential policy instruments to tackle consumption-related emissions in the post-Paris climate regime.

The event is being organised by the Carbon-Cap team - a research project ICTSD participates in. The Carbon-CAP project (Carbon emission mitigation by Consumption-based Accounting and Policy), funded by the European Union, addresses the vexed issue of consumption-based carbon accounting and policies. It aims to stimulate an effective climate policy mix - in the EU and internationally - that can address increasing consumption-related emissions in addition to the current focus on production emissions. It combines work on accounting models with cutting-edge policy research. The Carbon-Cap Consortium is composed of leading experts in climate policy, economics, environmental research, and modelling. For more information, please visit the Carbon-Cap website.

The event will take place on Monday, 7 November at 12:30-14:00 in the EU Pavilion of the COP.

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Place: 
Marrakesh, Morocco
Event type: 
Our events
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Carbon CAP Policy Brief 2: Acceptance of Consumption-based Climate Policy Instruments and Implementation Challenges
Main Tag: 
Event
programme: 
programme 1
Language: 
English
Partners: 

The side-event is organised by the Carbon-Cap consortium:

Practical info: 

Date: 7 November 2016

Time: 12:30-14:00

Participants must have COP 22 badges to access the event.

Date period: 
Monday, 7 November 2016 - 5:58pm

While some countries have been able to reduce emissions at the production level, they have in some cases increased them at the consumption side through imports of carbon embedded in internationally traded goods and services.

As a result, for some countries total emissions remain unchanged or have even increased. The climate community therefore needs to account for consumption-related emissions and explore policies for addressing them. Demand-side policies can also more directly address consumption as a driver of rising emissions through a wider range of mitigation options in the value chain and at the point of final consumption.

Over the past three years, the Carbon-CAP project has been exploring how EU policy might stimulate changes in consumer behaviour towards lower carbon consumption patterns to complement EU policies that focus on reducing emissions in the production of goods and energy. The goal has been to identify policies, policy instruments and strategies that would encourage such behavioural changes.

This final workshop of the project brought together researchers, businesses, policymakers and consumer groups to look at the results of the project, draw on the experiences and ideas of the participants, and answer the following questions:

  • What policies, policy instruments and/or strategies would be effective – if they were in place – in changing consumer behaviour towards low carbon goods?
  • How acceptable is a consumer-focused approach to policymakers, businesses and consumers, and under what conditions?
  • How can the actions of these three groups be coordinated to improve acceptability and effectiveness of a consumer-focused approach?
  • Where do past experiences suggest this approach is successful or not, and what have been the conditions that improve success?
  • Which of the approaches recommended by the Carbon-CAP should be the focus of the first EU policies, and how rapidly might the EU be able to implement them?
  • How can consumer-based policies identified in the Carbon-CAP contribute to EU and business initiatives such as Climate Policy, Circular Economy and Green Procurement Practices?

The day was organised around three panels on key findings and recommendations of the Carbon-CAP project and a less formal, interactive session that will bring participants together with other researchers, policymakers, business leaders and consumer representatives in small group discussions around issues of implementation.

About the Carbon-CAP project

The Carbon-CAP* project (Carbon emission mitigation by Consumption-based Accounting and Policy), funded by the European Union, addresses the vexed issue of consumption-based carbon accounting and policies. It aims to stimulate an effective climate policy mix - in the EU and internationally - that can address increasing consumption-related emissions in addition to the current focus on production emissions. The consortium is composed of leading experts in climate policy, economics, environmental research, and modelling. It combines work on accounting models with cutting-edge policy research. For more information, please visit the Carbon-Cap website.

*The Carbon-Cap project receives funding from the European Union's Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No 603386.

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Place: 
Brussels, Belgium
Event type: 
Our events
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Region: 
Europe
Main Tag: 
Event
programme: 
programme 1
Language: 
English
Partners: 

The side-event is organised by the Carbon-CAP consortium:

Practical info: 

Date: 11 October 2016

Time: 9:00-19:00

For further information and to sign up to attend the event, please visit the Eventbrite page.

 
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Date period: 
Tuesday, 11 October 2016 - 5:19pm

Consumption is a key driver of increasing emissions. As a result of the restructuring of global value chains, almost one quarter of global emissions are embedded in internationally traded goods and services. Reducing emissions at the global level will therefore require accounting for and finding policies to tackle demand-side emissions.

Addressing consumption-related emissions can help countries take responsibility for their extra-territorial emissions, thereby avoiding that their emissions are reduced at the expense of rising emissions elsewhere. It also provides opportunities for cooperation on climate action between producing and consuming countries. Complementing production-focused policies with consumption-side approaches can also help to more directly address consumption as a driver of increasing emissions by realising a wider range of mitigation options along the value chain and at the point of final consumption.

This side-event explored the role of consumption-based accounting and examined potential policy instruments to tackle consumption-related emissions in the post-Paris climate context.

The event was organised by the Carbon-Cap team - a research project ICTSD participates in. The Carbon-CAP project (Carbon emission mitigation by Consumption-based Accounting and Policy), funded by the European Union, addresses the vexed issue of consumption-based carbon accounting and policies. It aims to stimulate an effective climate policy mix - in the EU and internationally - that can address increasing consumption-related emissions in addition to the current focus on production emissions. It combines work on accounting models with cutting-edge policy research. The Carbon-Cap Consortium is composed of leading experts in climate policy, economics, environmental research, and modelling. For more information, please visit the Carbon-Cap website.

The event took place on Monday, 30 November from 12:30-14:00 in the EU Pavilion (Hall 2B).

 
 
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Place: 
Paris, France
Event type: 
Our events
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Exploring the trade impacts of consumer-facing climate policiesPolíticas climáticas orientadas al consumidor y sus impactos comerciales
Main Tag: 
Event
programme: 
programme 1
Language: 
English
Partners: 

The side-event is organised by the Carbon-Cap consortium:

Practical info: 

Date: Monday, 30 November 

Time: 12:30-14:00 

Accreditation: Please note that this venue is in the blue zone of the COP. Participants are...

Date period: 
Monday, 30 November 2015 - 12:47pm

As a result of global value chains, one quarter of global emissions are embedded in internationally traded goods and services. It is therefore important to account for and find policies to tackle demand-side emissions. 

Whereas some countries have indeed been able to reduce emissions at the production level, they have in some cases increased them at the consumption level through imports of carbon embodied in internationally traded goods and services. As a result, for some countries total emissions remain unchanged or have even increased.

Tackling climate change will therefore require complementing production-focused policies with consumption-based approaches. Doing so can also help to more directly address consumption as a driver of increasing emissions by realising a wider range of mitigation options along the value chain and at the point of final consumption.

This workshop engaged Chinese stakeholders from academia, the government and industry to discuss the opportunities and barriers for consumption-based accounting and policies. It discussed the global drivers of change in carbon emissions, explored behavioural improvement options and policy instruments to tackle demand-side emissions, and considered policy scenarios for consumption-based accounting. 

The workshop was organised by the Climate Group and the Carbon-Cap - a research project ICTSD participates in, funded by the EU Commission. Please visit the Carbon-Cap website for more information about the workshop.

About the Carbon-Cap project

The Carbon-CAP* project (Carbon emission mitigation by Consumption-based Accounting and Policy), funded by the European Union, addresses the vexed issue of consumption-based carbon accounting and policies. It aims to stimulate an effective climate policy mix - in the EU and internationally - that can address increasing consumption-related emissions in addition to the current focus on production emissions. It combines work on accounting models with cutting-edge policy research. The Carbon-Cap Consortium is composed of leading experts in climate policy, economics, environmental research, and modelling For more information, please visit the Carbon-Cap website.

*The Carbon-Cap project receives funding from the European Union's Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No 603386.

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Place: 
Beijing, China
Event type: 
Our events
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Exploring the trade impacts of consumer-facing climate policiesPolíticas climáticas orientadas al consumidor y sus impactos comerciales
Region: 
Asia
Main Tag: 
Event
programme: 
programme 1
Language: 
English
Partners: 

 

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Date period: 
Tuesday, 10 November 2015 - 1:46pm

Whereas some countries have been able to reduce emissions at the production level, they have in some cases increased them at the consumption level through imports of carbon embodied in internationally traded goods and services. As a result, for some countries total emissions remain unchanged or have even increased.

Therefore, it is necessary to account for emissions occurring through consumption and explore policies for addressing such emissions. In addition, consumption-oriented policies can more directly address consumption as a driver of rising emissions through a wider range of mitigation options in the value chain and at the point of final consumption.

Against this background, this workshop explored the role of consumption-based accounting in the context of international climate negotiations, examined potential policy instruments to tackle consumption-related emissions in key sectors, and discussed ways to overcome implementation barriers for consumption-based climate policies. It further explored the effect of the inclusion of consumption on supply chains and trade.

The workshop was organised by the Consortium of the Carbon-Cap project - a research project ICTSD participates in, which is funded by the EU Commission. The Consortium is composed of leading experts in climate policy, economics, environmental research, and modelling. 

About the Carbon-Cap project

The Carbon-CAP* project (Carbon emission mitigation by Consumption-based Accounting and Policy), funded by the European Union, addresses the vexed issue of consumption-based carbon accounting and policies. It aims to stimulate an effective climate policy mix - in the EU and internationally - that can address increasing consumption-related emissions in addition to the current focus on production emissions. It combines work on accounting models with cutting-edge policy research. For more information, please visit the Carbon-Cap website.

*The Carbon-Cap project receives funding from the European Union's Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No 603386.

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Place: 
Geneva, Switzerland
Event type: 
Our events
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No
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Exploring the trade impacts of consumer-facing climate policiesPolíticas climáticas orientadas al consumidor y sus impactos comerciales
Main Tag: 
Event
Language: 
English
Partners: 

The side-event is organised by the Carbon-Cap consortium:

Date period: 
Thursday, 8 October 2015 - 2:39pm

Carbon emissions embodied in internationally traded goods and services are growing. Current national and regional climate policies focus however primarily on production-based approaches. Consumption-based Accounting and Policy (CAP) measures can help address carbon embedded in international trade and consumption as a driver of increasing GHG emissions in order to drive more effective and ambitious mitigation.

Therefore, consumption-based approaches can play a positive role in complementing existing production-focused mitigation efforts. However, measuring and accounting of consumption-related emissions is complex. There is also a lack of reliable information about the effectiveness and feasibility of consumer-facing policy instruments.

Against this background, this side-event explored the issue of consumption-based accounting in the context of international climate negotiations and discussed potential policy instruments to address consumption-related emissions. The speakers presented amongst others an assessment of the likely success of different potential consumer-facing policy instruments. This included a consideration of implications for international trade.

A brief summary of the event can be found in the Earth Negotiations Bulletin (ENB).

The event was organised by the Consortium of the Carbon-Cap project*. This 3-year project aims to stimulate an effective climate policy mix - in the EU and internationally - that can address increasing consumption-related emissions in addition to the current focus on production emissions. It combines work on accounting models with cutting-edge policy research. 

*The Carbon-Cap project receives funding from the European Union's Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No 603386. 

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Place: 
Bonn, Germany
Event type: 
Our events
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Promote to homepage: 
Yes
Main Tag: 
Event
Language: 
English
Partners: 

The side-event is organised by the Carbon-Cap consortium:

Practical info: 

Date: 10 June 2015

Time: 15:00-16:30

Participants must have accreditation for the UNFCCC Bonn Climate Change Conference.

Date period: 
Wednesday, 10 June 2015 - 2:40pm